Archives for February 2011

Justice in the Case of Luis Santos’ Death: A California Citizen and Friend of the Santos’ Family Weighs In

Just a few years ago, in August 2008, I was sitting at a party in the home of the Santos family. Their home was full of love and laughter, and it was then that I was introduced to Luis Santos. He was a beautiful boy; and I could see him becoming a handsome man in the future. He was charming and quick to smile and laugh. He interacted with his elderly relatives, parents, and cousins in a way that was thoughtful and considerate. I spoke with him for quite a while that day, and he told me all about the goals had for himself, and what sounded like big plans for a really bright future I was both charmed and impressed by him.

Rebel Like an Egyptian: How Youth, Facebook, and Apple Inc. Toppled a Regime

Youthful civil disobedience will never be the same again. Thanks to their superior knowledge of modern technology, it will conquer. Think of it as the Ice Age Theory as opposed to the sudden Meteor Theory; a freeze which slowly but inevitably prevailed over the unsuspecting and unprepared Tyrannosaurus Rex. Used to being a force of terror, drunk on its own power, Mr. T. Rex just didn’t notice how chilly it was getting. Today, we are the dinosaurs compared to those who not only simply utilize the convenience and entertainment value of Skype, Facebook, Twitter, and iPhone, but know how they work. On this premise, governments will rise or fall, revolutions will succeed or fail, based on the skills of either side’s best hackers.

The Ticking Clock: An Egyptian’s First Hand Account of the Protest in Tahrir Square

It began with a Facebook event invite that had a catchy title: “Anger Friday for Revolution Against Corruption, Injustice, Unemployment, and Torture.” Roughly eighty thousand people were classified as “attending”, but the replies of over one million Facebook users were still listed “awaited”. Perhaps that was because there were several virtual farms and cities that needed tending to, and this was no game. Tahrir Square was to be both the physical and symbolic center of the protest, an appropriate decision given that tahrir is Arabic for ‘liberation’. Unlike the previous protest which had taken place three days earlier, this one was planned from the very start to go nationwide.