The Ticking Clock: An Egyptian’s First Hand Account of the Protest in Tahrir Square

by Taher Medhat   In the 1946 Alfred Hitchcock film, “Notorious”, Cary Grant’s Nazi-infiltrating T.R. Devlin scours through a wine cellar belonging to the host of a party which is going on upstairs. As Grant searches for the evidence to implicate his dastardly Nazi host, the viewer is treated to a classically Hitchcockian device: The […]

How to Win Your Office March Madness Pool

by Andrew Skaggs The greatest month of the year has arrived, at least for college basketball fans. That, of course, is the month of March, and along with it comes March Madness. It is an 18-day span of buzzer-beaters, legendary upsets, and the college atmosphere that accompanies each game. The tournament starts with 68 teams […]

TRUE GRIT Part Two of Into Africa: A Journal of a New Life in Uganda

by Sharon Walling No – this isn’t a movie review…but it is a moving review.  There is a strange phenomenon that I’ve experienced every single time I have eaten out in Uganda. Yes, even at 5-star restaurants at the Serena Hotel.  And that is, always, without fail, I will bite into a piece of bone, […]

The People on the Banks

by Con Carylon (Reporting from Toowoomba, Australia) After about twenty years of drought, Australia is now having rain and lots of it. Our dams, which were at a disastrous 7% level, are now approaching 70%, with rain predicted for a couple of months yet. Some may even get to 100 percent capacity. Toowoomba sits on […]

The Broccoli Dance

By Susanna Solomon Photo by Lydia Selk   When my daughter and her young children moved in a few months ago, I was none too pleased. Third house guests in less than a year. Nine months before I’d housed my stepdaughter, which didn’t work out too well, and after that my son moved in, and […]

The Sleeper

by Benjamin Russack “Just make sure she doesn’t fuck anybody.”  Tai worked the teeth of a comb across his fingers. “Alright?” I listened to the uneven tick of the plastic tines. Better than anyone else, I knew why Tai was nervous. Nineteen, fierce, brunette Joyce often took breakfast with no one but herself, at a […]

Justice in the Case of Luis Santos’ Death: A California Citizen and Friend of the Santos’ Family Weighs In

Just a few years ago, in August 2008, I was sitting at a party in the home of the Santos family. Their home was full of love and laughter, and it was then that I was introduced to Luis Santos. He was a beautiful boy; and I could see him becoming a handsome man in the future. He was charming and quick to smile and laugh. He interacted with his elderly relatives, parents, and cousins in a way that was thoughtful and considerate. I spoke with him for quite a while that day, and he told me all about the goals had for himself, and what sounded like big plans for a really bright future I was both charmed and impressed by him.

The Ticking Clock: An Egyptian’s First Hand Account of the Protest in Tahrir Square

It began with a Facebook event invite that had a catchy title: “Anger Friday for Revolution Against Corruption, Injustice, Unemployment, and Torture.” Roughly eighty thousand people were classified as “attending”, but the replies of over one million Facebook users were still listed “awaited”. Perhaps that was because there were several virtual farms and cities that needed tending to, and this was no game. Tahrir Square was to be both the physical and symbolic center of the protest, an appropriate decision given that tahrir is Arabic for ‘liberation’. Unlike the previous protest which had taken place three days earlier, this one was planned from the very start to go nationwide.

Karakia (Prayers for a Baby Boy)

by Eros-Alegra Clarke Prayers All day my body is curved around my seven-month-old baby, Joaquin. He rides on my hip, his hand resting on my breast, his arm slung over my shoulder. I am once again transformed into a one-armed pourer of tea, maker of ba-bas, masher of potatoes. A one-finger typist. In less than […]